Home > Developing Using CodeFluent Entities, PowerShell, Producers, SQL Server > Multi-database deployment with PowerShell and the Pivot Script Runner – Part 2

Multi-database deployment with PowerShell and the Pivot Script Runner – Part 2


In Part 1 of this article, we looked at using the PowerShell strengths to automate the process of updating several databases through the PivotRunner tool.

Now, we want to go further and create a PowerShell command, better known as a Cmdlet.

Build the Cmdlet

A Cmdlet can be built directly in a Powershell script, or through the .NET Framework. We need to inherit from System.Management.Automation.Cmdlet and define its naming attributes therefor.

By agreement, the name of a Cmdlet consists of a verb, followed by a dash and a name (e.g: Get-ChildItem andAdd-PSSnapIn):

using System.Management.Automation;

namespace CodeFluentEntitiesCmdlet
{
    [Cmdlet(VerbsData.Update, "CFEDatabase", SupportsShouldProcess = true, 
            ConfirmImpact = ConfirmImpact.High)]
    public class UpdateCFEDatabase : Cmdlet
    {
    }
}

Here, the Cmdlet’s name will be Update-CFEDatabase.

Use the following PowerShell command: Copy ([PSObject].Assembly.Location) C:\MyDllPath to find the System.Management.Automation library

SupportsShouldProcess and ConfirmImpact attributes allow the Cmdlet to use the PowerShell Requesting Confirmation feature.

The Cmdlet abstract class includes a fairly advanced command parameters engine to define and manage parameters:

[Parameter(Mandatory = true)]
public string ConnectionString { get; set; }

[Parameter(Mandatory = true)]
public string PivotFilePath { get; set; }

The Mandatory term is used to warn the command parameters engine of whether or not a parameter is required.

Cmdlet also exposes some methods which can be overriden. These pipeline methods allow the cmdlet to perform pre-processing operations, input processing operations, and post-processing operations.

Here, we’ll just override the ProcessRecord method:

protected override void ProcessRecord()
{
  // Process logic code
}

Then, we need to use the PivotRunner which is located in the CodeFluent.Runtime.Database assembly.

The tool takes the connection string and the pivot script producer output file as parameters:

using CodeFluent.Runtime;
using CodeFluent.Runtime.Database.Management.SqlServer;

private void UpdateDatabase()
{
    try
    {
        PivotRunner runner = new PivotRunner(PivotFilePath);

        runner.ConnectionString = ConnectionString;

        if (!runner.Database.Exists)
        {
            WriteObject("Error: The ConnectionString parameter does not lead to an existing database!");
            return;
        }
        runner.Run();
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        WriteObject("An exception has been thrown during the update process: " + e.Message);
    }
}

Do not forget to reference CodeFluent.Runtime.dll and CodeFluent.Runtime.Database.dll!

Moreover, we can recover the PivotRunner output (internal logs) by providing an IServiceHost implementation:

public class CmdletLogger : IServiceHost
{
    private Cmdlet _cmdLet;

    public CmdletLogger(Cmdlet cmdlet)
    { 
        _cmdLet = cmdlet;
    }

    public void Log(object value)
    {
        _cmdLet.WriteObject(value);
    }
}

runner.Logger = new CmdletLogger(this);
runner.Run();

Powershell integration

The Cmdlet is now finished! 🙂

Now we’ll see how to call it from Powershell! Here, we have several options, but we shall see the PSSnapIn one.

The “Writing a Windows PowerShell Snap-in” article shows that a PSSnapIn is mostly a descriptive object which inherits from System.Configuration.Install.Installer and is used to register all the cmdlets and providers in an assembly.

So, let’s implement our Powershell snap-in:

using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Management.Automation;

namespace CodeFluentEntitiesCmdlet
{
    [RunInstaller(true)]
    public class CodeFluentEntitiesCmdletSnapin01 : PSSnapIn
    {
        public CodeFluentEntitiesCmdletSnapin01()
            : base() { }

        public override string Name
        {
            get { return ((object)this).GetType().Name; }
        }

        public override string Vendor
        {
            get { return "SoftFluent"; }
        }

        public override string VendorResource
        {
            get { return string.Format("{0},{1}", Name, Vendor); }
        }

        public override string Description
        {
            get { return "This is a PowerShell snap-in that includes the Update-CFEDatabase cmdlet."; }
        }

        public override string DescriptionResource
        {
            get { return string.Format("{0},{1}", Name, Description); }
        }
    }
}

Then, we build our solution which contains our Cmdlet and the PSSnapIn and finally register the built library thinks to the InstallUtil.exe (located in the installation folder of the .NET Framework):

Administrator rights are required.

Administrator rights are required.

By using the “Get-PSSnapIn –Registered” Powershell command, we can observe that our PSSnapIn is well registered. This component can now be used into your Powershell environment:

Get-PSSnapIn–Registered

The “Add-PSSnapIn” command enables us to use our Cmdlet into the current session of Powershell.

As result, we can update our previously built Powershell script:

param([string[]]$Hosts, [string]$PivotFilePath, [switch]$Confirm = $true)

Add-PSSnapin CodeFluentEntitiesCmdletSnapin01

if ($Hosts -eq $null -or [string]::IsNullOrWhiteSpace($PivotFilePath))
{
    Write-Error "Syntax: .\UpdateDatabase.ps1 -Hosts Host1[, Host2, ...] -PivotFilePath PivotFilePath"
    break
}

[System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName('Microsoft.SqlServer.SMO') | out-null

Write-Host "-========- Script started -========-"

$Hosts | foreach {
    $srv = new-object ('Microsoft.SqlServer.Management.Smo.Server') $_

    $online_databases = $srv.Databases | where { $_.Status -eq 1 -and $_.Name.StartsWith("PivotTest_") }
    
    if ($online_databases.Count -eq 0)
    {
        Write-Error "No database found"
        break
    }

    Write-Host "Database list:"
    $online_databases | foreach { Write-Host $_.Name }

    [string]$baseConnectionString = "$($srv.ConnectionContext.ConnectionString);database="
    $online_databases | foreach {
        Update-CFDatabase -ConnectionString "$($baseConnectionString)$($_.Name)" -PivotFilePath $PivotFilePath -Confirm:$Confirm
    }
}

Write-Host "-========-  Script ended  -========-"

We can now simply deploy all changes we’ve recently made on our databases thanks to the Cmdlet and PivotRunner components.

The source code is available for download.

Happy PowerShelling !

The R&D team

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